CSW De-Briefing on 20/03/17: Data, UN Women, Education in Afghanistan for Girls

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    Submitted by Maureen Byrne

    CSW De-Briefing on Monday 20/03/2017:

    1. Data Statistics:
    Only 13-percent of countries dedicate money to gender statistics and 80-percent of the indicators for gender equality across the SDGs are lacking data. Countries need to include data from civil society with that of national statistics and surveys.
    Furthermore, statistics need to be more transparent and more accessible to users – it was suggested to use web-based sites, videos, social media. To improve data collection, countries and organisations need to develop statistical literacy. National surveys even at the household level may not accurately reflect the position of women. The briefing recommended collection of information as Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM). This would answer whether women have access to assets, land, ability to market products etc. Regarding Disability Inclusion in data, it is mostly missing. The briefing recommended the use of Washington Group short set of questions.
    2. UN Women: Consolidate and build on gains
    Areas of Agreement:
    *Intersectionality
    * North-South Issue – responsibility of developed nations to help
    developing nations
    *Taxation is an important means to address gender discrimination
    *Need to focus on Indigenous Women
    Lack of Agreement:
    *Unpaid work and role of state
    3. Role of Private Sector:
    Continue to show wider gender pay gap than in public sector. Government Role – Switzerland – role of disincentives –companies that don’t meet standards can’t get government procurements.
    4. Vocational training needs more attention.

    UNICEF: EDUCATION FOR ADOLESCENT GIRLS TOWARDS EMPOWERMENT OF
    WOMEN IN AFGHANISTAN
    Participants:
    *Associate Director of Education, UNICEF
    *Ambassador of Afghanistan
    *Deputy Minister of Education, Afghanistan
    *Aga Khan Foundation
    *Permanent Representative of Norway to UN
    *Head of UN Girls’ Education Initiative Secretariat
    Overview:
    In 2000 the Taliban closed all schools for girls. In 2002 only 900,000 children were in school and all of them were boys. Today 9.4 million are in school – 3.7 million are girls. There are still 3 million students in rural, hard-to-reach areas that are not in school. This has lead to a loss of a whole generation which could mean a devastating shortage of future nurses and doctors. Furthermore, many needs still exist – the curriculum is traditional and it does not address the tech issue and poor vocational training;. the need for better security and transportation so both students and teachers can get to school, and the shortage of female teachers.
    The success of this effort has clearly been due to a multi-prong effort– the government, civil society, outside countries such as Norway, organizations such as the World Bank. Aga Khan Foundation stressed need for flexibility, adapt to context of particular area. These efforts have improved teacher salaries and paid for transportation to school. Additionally, they have seen 142% increase in enrollment and 110% increase in graduation. 500 girls have graduated and became teachers – many returning to teach in the schools they came out of.

    Quotes of day:
    *BETTER DATA; BETTER LIVES
    *WITHOUT HALF THE POPULATION THERE IS NO WAY YOU CAN HAVE A
    PROSPEROUS SOCIETY.

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