SaharGamal

Ms.Gamal Independent Member, Egypt. CSW65 Parallel Event: Women and Corruption, Friday, 19 March 2021. Women's UN Report Network (WUNRN) and Graduate Women International (GWI). Women in power and decision-making, Women and the economy, Human rights of women, Education and training of women, Violence against women, Women and poverty, Institutional mechanisms, Women and health, Women and the media SDG 1 – No Poverty, SDG5 – Gender Equality, SDG8 – Decent Work and Economic Growth, SDG 10 – Reduced Inequality, SDG16 – Peace and Justice Strong Institutions, SDG17 – Partnerships to achieve the Goal Bullying (2016), Harassment (2016), Tolerance of Minority Groups (2016), Human Trafficking (2016), Sexual Harassment in Workplace (2019) Decreasing corruption requires addressing the causes that lead to it and the role played by gender. Women and girls can be the victims or the agents depending on the situation. The session focused on addressing the gender dimensions of corruption and how they lead to depriving women of their rights particularly in fields like education, politics and economy. Male dominated communities tend to benefit men on the expense of women. The answer to that is promoting an increase in women in leadership positions and in politics to help decrease corruption and increase gender equality. The presenters discussed both effects, corruption on women and women on corruption, in private and public sectors. They highlighted the fact that numerous forms of corruption are unreported, and thus unaddressed, because of gender-related factors such as stereotyping and patriarchal norms. This drew the attention to the effect of civil societies and judicial systems in promoting gender equality and justice. Suggested means for addressing these gender dimensions of corruption include: improving diversity and inclusiveness; promoting the quality education of women and girls; empowering women economically; promoting data collection and publication; effecting accountability and transparency; adopting gender-sensitive reporting and protection mechanisms; and highlighting Gender Champions as agents of change. In addition to their life-long advocacy of women and girls' rights to quality education and economic empowerment, GWI members can adopt these suggested means of addressing the gender dimensions of corruption. NFAs can raise the awareness of their local communities to the destructive effect of corruption on their safety and sustainability. They can also highlight their local Gender Champions. GWI, through its NFAs, can collaborate with United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) by providing case studies of corruption and how the local communities handled them. Exchanging experiences and information could be very helpful to both...

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BasakOvacik

Dr.Ovacik Turkish Association of University Women 23 March 2021-Backlash Against the Istanbul Convention Red Pepper Association Human rights of women, Violence against women SDG5 – Gender Equality, SDG16 – Peace and Justice Strong Institutions Polygamy (2016), Harassment (2016), Tolerance of Minority Groups (2016), FGM (2016), Child Marriage (2016) It is very related as my country announced that it withdrew from the convention. The Istanbul Convention -The Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence is an important legal document protecting women. Some countries want to withdraw from the convention as it is against the patriarchal system. The speakers talked about its importance and gave some country examples from Turkey and Poland. They all get informed about the regional(Europe) convention protecting women's rights against violence. They can adopt the same law to their national law codes. Or they can call their own governments to sign. Violence against women should be the red line of all women’s rights organization. It is the biggest priority now as they are more affected during...

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Basak Ovacik

Dr.Ovacik Turkish Association of University Women Women and Girls' Human Rights United Nations Language and Terminology-24 March 2021 NGO CSW Genava Institutional mechanisms SDG5 – Gender Equality Building Peace through Women’s Education (2019) non The speakers introduced the purpose of the task force created for gender terminology. A clear definition is needed internationally especially in law. Some terminology is not translatable to other languages. They described the concept of gender. They try to replace "sex" with "gender" identity. Very useful in leading to find the exact terms in our own language. We need to search for the exact term in our bulletins, web site, resolutions...

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Basak Ovacik

Dr.Ovacik Turkish Association of University Women Women on Boards-Impactful Leadership for Systemic Change and Inclusive Entities STEM Institute Women in power and decision-making, Education and training of women SDG4 – Quality Education, SDG5 – Gender Equality Women and STEM (2019) My NFA supports STEM education and encourage girls to prefer STEM fields at their education. Jackie K. Weatherspoon was the keynote speaker. UWE President Anne Negre and GWI member Shailo Mistry made excellent presentations. Alex Blakemore from Britain presented the academic side of STEM and gave statistics. It was an informative session with highlights from the world. We can write a statement on STEM education.Rate of progress varies in different parts of the world. But we need to take a collaborative action. The underlying low number in girls’ choice of STEM is gender inequalities they face. We need to provide gender equality...

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SaharGamal

Ms.Gamal Independent Member, Egypt. CSW65 Side Event: Connect2Include.Include2Connect, Thursday, 18 March 2021. International Telecommunication Union (ITU). Women in power and decision-making, The girl child, Women and the economy, Human rights of women, Education and training of women, Violence against women, Women and poverty, Women and health SDG3 – Good Health and Well-Being, SDG4 – Quality Education, SDG5 – Gender Equality, SDG8 – Decent Work and Economic Growth, SDG9 – Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure, SDG 10 – Reduced Inequality, SDG11 – Sustainable Cities and Communities, SDG17 – Partnerships to achieve the Goal Bullying (2016), Disability (2016), Harassment (2016), Tolerance of Minority Groups (2016), Young Members (2016) The session focused on the importance of connectivity and digital inclusion of women and girls as a powerful enabler and empowering tool . This coincides with GWI's Marketplace Initiative and, in turn, with FUWA's ICT Literacy Course targeting 100% literacy of FUWA members. This session was the second stop in ITU's "Road to Addis" for their "World Telecommunication Development Conference" (WTDC-2021) that will be held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 8-19 November 2021 preceded by a Youth Summit. ITU aims at achieving digital inclusion of women and girls, children,youth, persons with disabilities, older persons, indigenous peoples, and people living in remote areas. They aim to do so by ensuring that technology is people centered and that no one is left behind due to lack of connectivity or due to lack of accessibility of digital information, products and services. To achieve that, there is a need to develop appropriate policies, strategies and actions that address the specific needs for this digital inclusion. ITU promotes the building of inclusive digital societies because connectivity will help accelerate the global socio-economic recovery after the current pandemic. To accelerate connectivity for sustainable development, ITU identified "6 enablers" which are "Partnerships, Inclusion, Financing, Leadership, Innovation and Youth". Participants of this session concluded that "Connectivity and Inclusion" should be regarded as the 18th SDG and digitalization is the only means to do so. Because of the current pandemic situation, all GWI members have realized the importance of ICT literacy and accessibility. Women and girls' education has been negatively affected in areas where there is no appropriate digital infrastructure. Girls' school drop-outs and child marriage have increased. Women's economic independence has suffered because of lockdown and downsizing. VAW has increased, unreported and unnoticed, because of social distancing. ICT tools have been the main source for pandemic-related information and health-related advice. Digital platforms were the only available educational resources. Online small businesses have been the main source of women's economic independence. This session, in turn, provides GWI members with information related to digital accessibility...

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